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how to make a hard-boiled egg

A couple of weeks ago I shared my new skill, the over-easy egg.

Here’s an egg skill I’ve been repeating for years, the hard-boiled egg.

boiling eggs

Obviously I’m not the first to say this, but I do not like green eggs. I like them yellow, especially if I am making something like potato salad or deviled eggs. Green no. Yellow yes. I’m sure we agree.

hard boiled egg

If overcooked, hard boiled eggs are dry and rubbery. Isn’t that the way they are supposed to be? No, thank you.

I’m not about there being one right way to do most things in the kitchen, so however you get your egg job done is up to you, but here is my tried and true.

1. Place eggs in pan. Pour water over eggs, just until covered.

cover eggs with water

2. Turn the heat on high and bring to a boil.

bring eggs to a boil

3. As soon as the water starts to boil, cover the put with a lid, turn off the heat, and leave it to sit on the burner. Set your timer for 14 minutes.

egg timer

4. Drain the water and recover with cold water. Set your timer for 2 minutes.

egg timer

5. Drain the water a second time. Holding the lid on the pan with both hands, gently shake eggs back and forth, for about 10 seconds, to crack all the shells against each other. Do this gently so you don’t bust open all your eggs. Peel the eggs.

peel hard boiled eggs

6. The shells should slip off pretty easily. If not, take your time, crack them some more, rinse under cold water perhaps, and keep peeling bit by bit.

hard boiled eggs

I like to store hard boiled eggs in a container with a paper towel to absorb all the moisture. Unless of course we eat them warm and mashed up with butter, salt, and pepper. Hello, nostalgic breakfast from the 80’s, right there on your plate.

Enjoy!

hard-boiled eggs
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Makes: 1 dozen
Ingredients
  • 1 dozen eggs
Instructions
  1. Place eggs in pan. Pour water over eggs, just until covered.
  2. Turn the heat on high and bring to a boil.
  3. As soon as the water starts to boil, cover the put with a lid, turn off the heat, and leave it to sit on the burner. Set your timer for 14 minutes.
  4. Drain the water and recover with cold water. Set your timer for 2 minutes.
  5. Drain the water a second time. Holding the lid on the pan with both hands, gently shake eggs back and forth, for about 10 seconds, to crack all the shells against each other. Do this gently so you don’t bust open all your eggs. Peel the eggs.
  6. The shells should slip off pretty easily. If not, take your time, crack them some more, rinse under cold water perhaps, and keep peeling bit by bit.

~H

*Note: I recently read that the fresher the egg, the harder they are to peel. I’ve found this to be true. I like to buy eggs and hard boil them a few days after they’ve sat in my fridge.

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